7 countries which have the most holidays

Public holidays are an essential part of a country’s culture and traditions.

They offer citizens a chance to celebrate significant historical events, religious festivals, and national achievements.

Some countries are known for having an extensive list of holidays, providing ample opportunities for rest and celebration.

This article explores seven countries with the most holidays, highlighting the unique aspects of their festive calendars.

1. Nepal

Nepal tops the list with an impressive 35 public holidays annually. The country’s diverse cultural and religious landscape contributes to this high number. Major holidays include Dashain, Tihar, and Holi, which are celebrated with great enthusiasm across the nation. Additionally, Nepal observes various regional and ethnic festivals, reflecting its rich cultural heritage. The extensive list of holidays allows Nepalese people to enjoy numerous festive occasions throughout the year.

2. Myanmar

Myanmar follows closely with 32 public holidays. The country celebrates a mix of Buddhist, cultural, and national holidays. Significant holidays include Thingyan (the Burmese New Year), Thadingyut (the Festival of Lights), and Independence Day. These holidays are deeply rooted in Myanmar’s traditions and are celebrated with various rituals and festivities. The abundance of holidays provides ample time for citizens to engage in cultural and religious activities.

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3. Iran

Iran has 26 public holidays, many of which are based on Islamic traditions. Important holidays include Nowruz (the Persian New Year), Eid al-Fitr, and Ashura. Nowruz, celebrated on the vernal equinox, is one of the most significant holidays, marking the start of the new year in the Persian calendar. The country’s holidays reflect its rich history and cultural diversity, offering Iranians numerous opportunities to celebrate their heritage.

4. Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka enjoys 25 public holidays, attributed to its multiethnic and multireligious population. Major holidays include Sinhala and Tamil New Year, Vesak (Buddha’s Birthday), and Christmas. The country also observes Poya days, which are monthly Buddhist holidays marking the full moon. These holidays are celebrated with various customs and rituals, reflecting Sri Lanka’s cultural and religious diversity. The numerous holidays provide Sri Lankans with ample time for family gatherings and celebrations.

5. ​Bangladesh

Bangladesh has 22 public holidays, with a mix of religious and national events. Major holidays include Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha, and Independence Day. The country also celebrates Bengali New Year (Pohela Boishakh) with vibrant festivities. These holidays are deeply ingrained in the country’s culture and are celebrated with great enthusiasm. The extensive list of holidays allows Bangladeshis to enjoy numerous festive occasions throughout the year.

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6. Egypt

Egypt observes 21 public holidays, many of which are based on Islamic traditions. Significant holidays include Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha, and Sham El-Nessim (a spring festival). The country also celebrates national holidays such as Revolution Day and Armed Forces Day. These holidays are marked by various customs and traditions, reflecting Egypt’s rich cultural heritage. The abundance of holidays provides Egyptians with ample time for family gatherings and celebrations.

7. India

India is known for its varied culture and many festivals. With almost 21 public holidays, the country commemorates a wide range of religious and cultural events. Major holidays include Diwali, Holi, Eid, Christmas, and Independence Day. Each state has its own set of holidays, which reflect local traditions and customs. The vast number of holidays in India demonstrates its rich cultural heritage and the value of family and community gatherings.